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Some of this information comes from the listings of Non-Prefixed and Non-Suffixed aircraft reviewed by me in the archives of the National Air & Space Museum, Washington, DC.

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Your copy of the "Davis-Monthan Airfield Register" with all the pilots' signatures and helpful cross-references to pilots and their aircraft is available at the link. Or use this FORM to order a copy signed by the author. ISBN 978-0-9843074-0-1.

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STINSON M-200 (SM-1B) NC1019

STINSON M-200 (SM-1B) NC1019

ACCIDENT-PRONE BROADCASTER

This airplane is a Stinson M-200 (SM-1B) S/N M-205; ATC #16/GR 2-24.  It was manufactured in August, 1927 by the Stinson Aircraft Corporation, Northville, MI.  It left the factory with a Wright Whirlwind J-5 CA engine (S/N 7663) of 200 HP.  It was a six-place airplane weighing 3,310 pounds gross.

It was sold on August 3, 1927 to the A.W. Shaw Company, Chicago, IL “for advertising and sales work”.  The company was in publishing (purchased by the McGraw-Hill Company in 1928).  Richard C. Allen was the company pilot. Thanks to Tim Kalina (right sidebar) for these images.

Stinson NC1019 in Shaw Livery, Date & Location Unknown (Source: Kalina)
Stinson NC1019 in Shaw Livery, Date & Location Unknown (Source: Kalina)

The person sitting on the wheel may be Register pilot Henry Pascale (Transport License #2368; see the back of the photo below identifying the young man as "Hank"), although he looks young. Pascale was born ca. 1895, which would make him in his early 30s if this photo was taken sometime during Shaw Company's ownership. The young man has goggles on his shoulder. Pascale flew this airplane later, but not to Tucson (see below).

Stinson NC1019 in Shaw Livery, Date & Location Unknown, Back (Source: Kalina)
Stinson NC1019 in Shaw Livery, Date & Location Unknown, Back (Source: Kalina)

We find NC1019 at Tucson twice.  It landed first on September 8, 1928 piloted by Richard Allen carrying passenger R.L. Pulman.  They listed their home base as Los Angeles, CA (Chicago?), but did not cite their itinerary.  I know nothing about this flight.

The airplane went through two quick sales in 1929.  On January 19th it sold to Air Activities, Inc., Chicago, IL and a “new style” landing gear was installed between April 30th and July 16.  On October 7th it sold to Walter W. Williams, Bloomington, IL for $5,250.  It stayed with Williams for about 2.5 years. A site visitor from Bloomington states, "Walter Williams ... was an Aeronautical Engineer and president of the Williams Company in Bloomington. The firm did much experimental aviation work beginning about 1916 through the 50's. "

On May 4, 1931, Williams requested a “NR” license “restricted for the broadcasting of music and voice by means of an amplifying system.”  The weight of the amplifying system was given as 410 pounds, and it was installed in place of two center seats.  Only the pilot and equipment operator were allowed to fly in the airplane.  The NR license was canceled on September 15, 1931 and the airplane was converted back to its NC, six-place configuration.

We find NC1019 at Tucson the second time on April 1, 1932.  It was flown by Art Carnahan, Bloomington, IL, carrying two unidentified passengers.  They were northwest bound from El Paso, TX to Globe, AZ.   This may have been a ferry flight from Illinois to California, because, on April 11, 1932, NC1019 sold to H.C. Lippiatt, Bel Air, CA.  Lippiatt was a dealer/broker of aircraft.  In a quick turnaround, Lippiatt transferred the airplane to F.A. Carnahan, Bloomington, IL on the same day. 

Pilot Log Book Cover, Henry Pascale (Source: Kalina)
Pilot Log Book Cover, Henry Pascale (Source: Kalina)

 

A month later, on May 3, 1932, a letter from the CAA announced that, “all aircraft of this model are overweight and 1 seat should be removed.  To be done as of 6/6/32.  Gr. Wt. not to exceed 3600 # as 5 PCLM.”  Carnahan’s “new” airplane was disapproved upon inspection on June 15, 1932 for lack of the modification.  He was stranded with a non-airworthy Stinson in Van Nuys, CA.

Carnahan did not own the airplane for long, and it did not leave California.  On August 19, 1932, he sold it to W.W. Chisholm, Van Nuys, CA.  And Chisholm turned it over next day to Aero Brokerage Service Company, Inglewood, CA. 

Now begins a series of sales and accidents that bring to light the real hardships some of our Davis-Monthan aircraft endured through their mostly brief lives.  On August 20, 1932 Aero Brokerage sold NC1019 to Duck Air Services, Oakland, CA.  They had it re-covered (and repainted, see photos below) and overhauled, and installed a tail wheel.  It had 696:55 flight hours. 

Below are two photographs of the airplane while in Duck Air Services livery. Both photos show an unknown woman posing with the airplane. Note the differences in the paint scheme when compared with the photograph at the top of this page.

Stinson NC1019, Ca. 1932+ (Source: Mattson)
Stinson NC1019, Ca. 1932+ (Source: Mattson)

These photos are shared with us courtesy of Ed Mattson (they, and others, are for sale at his link). A close look at the photo below shows a U.S. Forest Service logo on the access door. There is no mention of the airplane flying for the Forest Service in any of the NASM records.

Stinson NC1019, Ca. 1932+ (Source: Mattson)
Stinson NC1019, Ca. 1932+ (Source: Mattson)

In Palo Alto, CA on August 10, 1933 it suffered an accident requiring repairs to the left wing, landing gear and fuselage.  As of October 3, 1934 it had accumulated 881:51 flight hours (about 200 hours flying the previous year). 

We can document three of the flights by NC1019 when it was with Duck as recorded in pilot Henry Pascale's log book (cover above; page from 1936, below). These flights spanned April-May, 1936, and were local to Oakland, with one flight south to Paso Robles and return. Pascale carried M.R. Duck, Transport license #10,059, as passenger. Perhaps these were training flights for Mr. Duck, who shows up later in November flying another Stinson, NC458Y (not a Register airplane).

Pilot Log Book 1935-36, Henry Pascale (Source: Kalina)
Pilot Log Book 1935-36, Henry Pascale (Source: Kalina)

Note on the right-hand page of Pascale's log that he notes Bettie Lund and Frank Tomick as passengers. Neither were Register signers, but Lund was the wife of Register pilot Freddie Lund. Please direct your browser to his link for photographs of him and Betty. Tomick was a movie stunt pilot of renown. Read about him in this REFERENCE.

After Duck Air Services, NC1019 went through two more civilian owners in 1936-37.  It suffered three accidents (all in California) during 1938-39, requiring major repairs to the right wing, an axle, and re-covering of the left wing and fuselage.  As of March 1, 1940 the airplane had accumulated 1850:00 flight hours (about 1,000 hours in six years; a good amount of flying for a civil aircraft, even by today’s measure).

On March 2, 1940 it sold for $675 to George Ewald Justman, Olympia, WA.  It then traveled back to California through three more owners during 1940-41.  Here the record goes blank.  Post-war correspondence from the government was returned unclaimed.  There is no record of the ultimate disposition of NC1019.  The registration was cancelled on May 18, 1949.  Perhaps this airplane is in a barn somewhere in California?  Wouldn’t that be a find!

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THIS PAGE UPLOADED: 04/10/06 REVISED: 01/15/08, 04/12/11, 09/12/11

 
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I'm looking for photographs of this airplane to include on this page. If you have one or more you'd like to share, please use this FORM to contact me.

I'm also looking for infomation about pilot Henry Pascale.

Thanks to Tim Kalina for sharing the photographs and log book on this page.

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http://www.cafepress.com/content/global/img/spacer.gifThe Congress of Ghosts is an anniversary celebration for 2010.  It is an historical biography, that celebrates the 5th year online of www.dmairfield.org and the 10th year of effort on the project dedicated to analyze and exhibit the history embodied in the Register of the Davis-Monthan Airfield, Tucson, AZ. This book includes over thirty people, aircraft and events that swirled through Tucson between 1925 and 1936. It includes across 277 pages previously unpublished photographs and texts, and facsimiles of personal letters, diaries and military orders. Order your copy at the link, or use this FORM to order a copy signed by the author.  ISBN 978-0-9843074-4-9.

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